About Lina Kumar

Lina Kumar

Lina Kumar is a podiatrist that qualified from Plymouth and Brighton Universities with a BSc (Hons) and MSc in Podiatry in 2001 and 2004 respectively. Since then she has worked for the NHS and private sector as a podiatrist with a special interest in wound care and diabetes.

In 2016 Lina qualified as a nutritionist from the Blackford Institute and has since followed her passion in this field. Lina is a believer in a balanced dietary regime and advocates the Mediterranean Diet. Having been born and brought up in Cyprus, she had the blessing to be surrounded by fields of fig, citrus, olive, cherry and almond trees, vineyards, as well as an array of fresh fruit, vegetables and herbs. She was privileged enough to be able to go into the garden and pick these foods fresh from the field and have a diet that was based on wholesome and organically-grown food.

Since having moved to the UK in 1998 she has strived to have as healthy a diet as possible for herself and her family, with fresh produce, olive oil (which her mum and dad still make at the olive mill from their own olive trees and bring over to England on their visits), nuts and seeds, fish and little meat.

With the steep rise in diabetes, obesity and heart disease, it is in our hands to take control of our health and, along with exercise and a happy mind, use food as a powerful tool to take control and fend off disease.

Diabetes and endocrine health issues are multifactorial metabolic conditions, which need a multi-faceted approach. This is comprised of medical therapeutics such as nutrition, exercise, motivation and structured education in order to achieve optimal outcomes for prevention and cure. Recognising this early in her career as a specialist podiatrist, Lina decided to add an important aspect of nutrition to her clinical approach eg: mediterranean diet in diabetes, iodine replete state in thyroid, calorie deficit in weight loss, current concepts of intermittent fasting etc.

In this blog, we will explore the power that lies in naturally-occurring foods and how we can use them to optimise our health, based on what issues we experience.

We cover many aspects of food and nutrition, with a focus on the key ingredients of the Mediterranean diet, which is evidence-based again and again for its benefits.

Happy reading and please get in touch with your comments or questions- I love questions!

Articles by Lina

Why whole food concentrates

In our consultations we may recommend that you take some wholefood supplements.  The reasons for this are as follows: Our fresh produce is significantly nutrient-deplete compared to what it was several decades ago.  According to The American Society for Horticultural Science, there has been an alarming decrease in the nutritional value of fruits and vegetables […]

The Surprising Seven Problems

The most common problems encountered in our practice when looking at clients’ food diaries are the following: Dehydration It is recommended that we drink an average of 8-10 glasses of water every day.  Water has around 10 functions in the human body and is an essential nutrient. The Mayo Clinic explains how much total fluid […]

What’s bitter about sugar?

We all know that sugar is bad for our teeth  and our waistline.  But, what are the more concealed and serious effects that sugar has on the body? A study published in the American Journal of Public Health found that drinking a 20-ounce (600ml) sugar-sweetened soft drink a day was associated with the equivalent of 4.6 years […]

Does diet have a role to play in erectile function?

Erectile dysfunction (ED) affects around 18 million men in the US alone (1).  It is associated with reduced sexual intimacy and quality of life, as well as psychological distress for both the affected person and their partners.  Modifiable factors for ED are largely similar to those of cardiovascular disease and include smoking, obesity, inactivity, diabetes […]

Feed your immune cells

Our immune system is a complex interaction made up of at least six different cells, the bone marrow, lymph nodes, spleen, appendix and skin. The immune system has a vital role: to protect us from harmful substances, germs and cell changes that could make us ill. It’s also one of the most fundamental systems in […]

Optimise your Immune System

There is something called ‘plasticity’ in our immune system. This means that when the immune system sees a pathogen it has never seen before- e.g. a virus, fungus or bacterium- it can come up with a defence mechanism to deal with it in the most efficient way. It activates the ‘army’ to tackle this pathogen […]